new owner

Please post your bike pics here

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Volker_P
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Re: new owner

Postby Volker_P » Mon Nov 20, 2006 5:17 am

seems like you were not tired the last time. Good progress, in Germany you probably would still fight with bureaucracy to get a permission to destroy a valuable spiders biotope. :lol:

Some comments:

- You did a good job cleaning the engine. I am surprised that the material is not that rotten as I have guessed from the first pictures. With some additional work, it could look great again.

- The "OKI heat-sink thingy’s" are the CDI units. The tar-like insulation may melt (due to some electrics poblem). However they may still work, just put back that tar. But once molten it won't get solid enough any more and will get out again. One solution is to cover the tar with some epoxy, at least that's what I did and it works since many years.

- You found a very easy way to get the carbs out (with the airbox and all removed). If you can, re-install them early again. Carb removal/installation is a hard job with the air chamber installed.

- The carbs have to line up. Probably someone got wrong boots. Be careful here, they are different for carb types (diameter) as well as between models (length). I think there was "460"(for RC05) or "425"(for RC03) stamped on them. Or something else, I think Robert should now :D ?

- The "cam-switch thingy" is your neutral light switch. It switches to ground like the oil pressure switch.

Maybe you should already start to soak the aluminium spacer on the long top horizontal rear engine bolt. I would be surprised if it would move without trouble on the bolt. One may get the engine out anyway (depending on the orientation of the bolt). I have a spare frame with this bolt blocked by this spacer, no chance to get it out without destroying something. Check also rear axis aluminium spacer for the same trouble.

pae
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Postby pae » Mon Nov 20, 2006 12:08 pm

Wow, Volker, mighty impressed, you've read it all :D The spiders all left home a long time ago - only the fossilised remains of a few (and their cobwebs) left now :lol:

Neutral light - that makes sense, thanks for that. And the CDI's. I know a man (with 2 CB550's incidentally) who's very good with electrics and wiring. I'll have a serious think about re-doing the wiring, or at least some of it.

And yes, I'll certainly start 'preparing' the long spacer/engine mount bolt.

Thanks for the feedback. When I get into details (carbs for example) I'll break up the dialogue into separate web pages to keep the strip/clean/rebuild of those in one place.

It has all come apart quite easy so far. Really enjoying myself, especially as I sit at a computer most days so it's great to get out in the garage and some fresh air when I can :D

regards, Phil

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Volker_P
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Re: new owner

Postby Volker_P » Tue Nov 21, 2006 2:07 am

I am interested as it is a quite demanding task with a bike which has no special classic status besides looking very classic. It is a good sign that everything came out easy so far, so probably only the surface suffered and the bike was serviced not too bad the most time before.

Doing something with your hands is really a good balancing to computer work. If it would not be much easier to earn my money with my brain, I would prefer doing some craftsmen work. Well, as I only have old things I never run out of this kind of work even without an actual project :D.

In case you don't have a manual, Ibsen provided a link to an online manual in the "Replacing the cam chain tensioner" thread.

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Postby pae » Tue Nov 21, 2006 3:35 am

Thanks Volker. Whoever did look after the bike previously has taken care, as many of the bolts have copper-grease on them. Not many people bother to do that, but this chap did, so it shows some mechanical consideration. I think it mainly looked so tatty simply for standing idle for about 3 years (although the engine was last run about a year ago).

So yes, basically under the cobwebs :) it's a sound bike, and the more I strip down the more pleased I am with what I've got. No major worries have been uncovered yet.

I have a manual thanks, but have also linked to a few online ones. So far most of the strip down has been fairly obvious from past experience of bikes and cars, but I've no doubt I'll need to refer to the manuals soon.

regards, Phil

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Postby pae » Sun Nov 26, 2006 1:17 pm

Hi guys, a few more productive hours over the weekend, and I've got the engine on the bench now :D :D

Image why doesn't the image link work???

regards, Phil

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Chris
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Postby Chris » Sun Nov 26, 2006 8:13 pm

Hmm, I was noticing the tread pattern on that front tire... is it mounted backwards?
1980 CB650c

pae
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Postby pae » Mon Nov 27, 2006 3:36 am

Chris wrote:Hmm, I was noticing the tread pattern on that front tire... is it mounted backwards?


Good question. Just had a look, and it is the right way round. It doesn't hold any air so will be junked for fresh tyres before the bikes on the road. I've no idea how old the tyre is.

regards, Phil

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Postby pae » Fri Jan 19, 2007 3:25 am

quick update...

Some bits are away for plating/chroming at the moment
everything that's being painted is ready to go.
Other bits are being cleaned, polished/greased (delete as applicable :D )

Next target is to have a clean, shiny rolling frame back together. As usual updates are being logged at http://uk.geocities.com/cb650@btinternet.com/

regards, Phil

pae
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Postby pae » Mon Apr 09, 2007 12:47 pm

Well it's back on it's wheels and the engine is painted too :D Head is next to come off, then engine can go back in thr frame whilst I strip and check over the top end. Latest page at http://uk.geocities.com/cb650@btinternet.com

regards, Phil

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Ibsen
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Postby Ibsen » Mon Apr 09, 2007 6:17 pm

You have done an excellent job Phil. :D

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Volker_P
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Postby Volker_P » Tue Apr 10, 2007 1:30 am

I agree this is very impressing. :D As I am completly unexperienced with painting I will never understand how one can get painted e.g. the cooling fins without having paint pouring down everywhere.

pae
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Postby pae » Tue Apr 10, 2007 2:56 pm

The painting was a lot easier than I thought it would be. The pictures do not tell exactly the whole story because right between some of the fins the paint finish isn't great, but I really could not find any way of cleaning them more.

The spray paint took really well to the aluminium, and you could spray quite heavily without it running, plus it dried really quick. Overall I'm very pleased. I think with the cylinder head done, and the side cases polished up (one has been 80% done and looks beautiful), the engine will look great.

Thanks for the kind words,

keep looking for more pics (cyl head removal next)

regards, Phil

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Volker_P
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Postby Volker_P » Wed Apr 11, 2007 1:47 am

I have a spare engine to replace my 100000km original one but it does not look very pretty. Painting would help but I worry a bit on thermal consequences and, moreover how to get this done with an acceptable result. I have a compressor but no painting equipment so far. But enough cylinders with fins to practice. :lol:
Maybe it is time to learn this also. Probably surface preparation is the most important thing? Meanwhile I have many things worth to get a new outfit. Any links to instructions for an ambitious, unexperienced beginner are welcome.

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Vatch
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Postby Vatch » Wed Apr 11, 2007 10:14 am

Looks great Phil.
'99 1500 Drifter

pae
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Postby pae » Sat Apr 14, 2007 3:03 pm

Volker_P wrote:I have a spare engine to replace my 100000km original one but it does not look very pretty. Painting would help but I worry a bit on thermal consequences and, moreover how to get this done with an acceptable result. I have a compressor but no painting equipment so far. But enough cylinders with fins to practice. :lol:
Maybe it is time to learn this also. Probably surface preparation is the most important thing? Meanwhile I have many things worth to get a new outfit. Any links to instructions for an ambitious, unexperienced beginner are welcome.


Hi Volker, most of my information comes from sohc4.net forum, here... http://www.sohc4.us/forums/

Do a search on 'engine paint' and you'll be reading for hours, so put the coffee on first :lol:

I just cleaned mine as well as I could with de-greaser, and brushed well with a wire brush to remove as much loose paint as I could. Then plenty of degreaser, soapy water, repeat again and again seemed to be the answer. The hardest part is actually getting in between the fins properly as the dirt won't just wash away, it needs brushing. As with everything, preparation is what matters.

regards, Phil


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